Thursday, 20 July 2017

Fantastic News on the disability front

I just an email from these people Helm Do have a look at their website.

I cant explain how excited I am as I really wanted an Egyptian organisation to pick this up and run with it.. 

The email said "Your email is actually spot on! This is exactly our focus for 2017/2018 we will be working on Luxor temples and other main locations to become more accessible. We will be in Luxor maybe next week or the week after to discuss the project further wit the Governor of Luxor.
I'll email you when we know the exact date so we can meet during our visit to Luxor"


Whoop whoop whoop

EEF INFORMATION, ARCHIVES & FAQ

EEF INFORMATION, ARCHIVES & FAQ



If you were impressed by the information shared by EEF here are details should you want to join the mailing list. It is a truly excellent resource

[EEF] concerning rumours about a possible new tomb in the VoK

Thanks to the wonderful EEF for this considered analysis

------------------------











As the popular press is now picking it up (see 2nd entry
below), I suppose it cannot be blissfully ignored anymore -- but please note
the lack of MoA confirmation and the excess of speculation:


* Press report: "King Tut's Wife May Be Buried in
Newly Discovered [sic] Tomb"


"Famed archaeologist Zahi Hawass and his team say
they've found evidence of a tomb that could belong to King Tut's wife.  The archaeologists eventually plan to
excavate the new tomb, which is located near the tomb of the pharaoh Ay
(1327-1323 B.C.) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, Hawass
told Live Science. "We are sure there is a tomb there, but we do not know
for sure to whom it belongs," Hawass told Live Science in an email. On
July 7, National Geographic Italia published an article in Italian suggesting
that a team led by Hawass had found a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings, and
Hawass confirmed that discovery to Live Science. "We are sure there is a
tomb hidden in that area because I found four foundation deposits,"
Hawass said, explaining that the foundations are
"caches or holes in the ground that were filled with votive objects such
as pottery vessels, food remains and other tools as a sign that a tomb
construction is being initiated." "The ancient Egyptians usually did
four or five foundation deposits whenever they started a tomb's
construction," Hawass said. Additionally, "the radar did detect a substructure
that could be the entrance of a tomb."(...) Hawass said he will direct the
future excavations at the site. (..)"

[Submitted by Kat Newkirk]
* Other English press reports, based on the above press
report (adding nothing extra):





"(..) In a follow up update to Livescience however,
Hawass cautions that there might not be a tomb there, and that further
excavations are required to be certain."

* For the mentioned Italian press report of National Geographic
Italia that started all this, see EEFNEWS (986):


It seems to have been taken down since...; you can refind
it at


"(..) accanto alla KV23, (..) I test effettuati tra
febbraio e maggio dai tecnici di Livorno con l'ERT hanno rilevato anomalie
conduttive nella roccia lì dove Hawass ha individuato i foundation deposits di
un'altra tomba reale che potrebbe appartenere ad Ankhesenamon (..)."

* The Minister has hinted at "an important
archaeological discovery that will astonish the whole world, (..) a graveyard
dating dating back to the Pharaonic era" being in the pipeline, but
without giving any details:


* Please note that MoA has NOT issued any official press
releases yet about the scanning results, making the Italian interview
premature/indiscreet.
Also note that no tomb has been found yet, despite the
headers of the press reports; a scanning anomaly does nót make a discovered
tomb and speculation about any owner is even more premature.

* The foundation deposits mentioned seem to be those
found in 2007-2011 by a team with Afifi Rohim Affifi as field
supervisor, and might belong to an unfinished tomb; their report with photos
and plans can be read online (with thanks to Jan Bailey for the
URL!):

Afifi Rohim Afifi and Glen Dash, "The Discovery of
Intact Foundation Deposits in the Western Valley of the Valley of the
Kings", Proceedings CRE 2014 (2015), pp. 1-12



Aayko Eyma




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Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Saturday, 15 July 2017

Amenemhat TT82 a new tpmb from Osirisnet







Osirisnet
has just published a new Theban Tomb: Amenemhat TT82.

See here:  http://www.osirisnet.net/tombes/nobles/amenemhat82/e_amenemhat82_01.htm
Amenemhat is "steward of the Vizier", as well as "scribe who reckons
the corn in the granary of the divine offerings of Amun,” during the reign of
Tuthmosis III. Though he appears as a subordinate personage to us, he is a rich
and cultured dignitary.

Amenemhat had profound knowledge of religious beliefs and
of the most complex myths, an astonishing accomplishment for someone not
holding any priestly office. For instance, he reused spells from the Pyramid
Texts,
the great funerary corpus of the Old Kingdom, something few notables
of his time were capable of doing.

Amenemhat was able to create  a tomb rich in information about the
Egyptian ideas about of death and rebirth, and divine beliefs in general. So
much so that TT82 is an essential source of knowledge concerning the funeral
practices of the time.

While punctiliously respecting traditions, Amenemhat was also an innovator, and
it is in his tomb that the oldest known magic bricks have been discovered.

Sunday, 2 July 2017

Improving Disabled Access at the Archaeological Sites of Egypt.





Improving Disabled Access at the Archaeological Sites of Egypt.: This paper outlines the problem with a case study, gives a proposed solution together with why the project should be done. It also suggests possible funding sources



Link to Proposal

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Security at Luxor airport.



Security at Luxor airport.  5th June 2017

Report from Joanne Stables

Following the implementation of the
relatively new electronics ban on all flights to the UK from Egypt, I was
happily surprised that everything at the airport was running smoothly. At the
main entrance to the airport, the underneath and boot of the car was checked
for hidden devices, and travellers are required to show their passport &
flight ticket. At the entrance to the terminal, passport and flight tickets
must be show again. Just inside the terminal, all luggage are put through a
baggage scanner whilst passengers pass through a metal detector and are 'padded
down' by a security officer. After this, passengers are then sent over to have
their luggage checked for traces of illegal substances; this seems to be part
of the normal procedure now.

Finally off to check-in! Here, staff remind
passengers of the electronic ban and answer any questions. As my laptop and
external hard drive were already in my hold luggage, the staff did not ask to
see them. As I had declared the laptop, the check-in staff secured my padlock
and zips on my case with cable ties, and a fragile label was attached.
Following check-in, the procedure through passport control remains unchanged.
The security check (involving a baggage scan and metal detector) between the
duty free and gate also remains the same.

What has changed is that before travellers
get to the gate, there are two more additional security checks before reaching
the gate; at both, travellers are required to write their name and passport
number in a book. At the first additional check, security staff hand search all
your bags. At the second additional security check, travellers are either
required to have their bags searched again or have their luggage tested for
traces of illegal substances. These last two security checks seem a little hit
and miss and at no point was I asked to show that my cameras and mobile phones
were working. I would argue, that the two additional security checks are
overkill and unnecessary.

Now back in the UK, I am happy to report my
laptop arrived in one piece despite seeing the baggage handlers at Heathrow
ignoring my suitcase was identified as fragile. For anyone else travelling back
to the UK with a restricted electronic device, I highly recommend wrapping it
in bubble wrap. I went further and placed my laptop in a sturdy cardboard box
which was placed between hardback books in the centre of my suitcase.

Sunday, 4 June 2017

Hatshepsut Stairway

This is one of those little projects that comes from nowhere. When visiting the various temples as part of my disabled project I puzzled about this ramp at Deir el Bahri. It did not make logical sense to me to have the ramps at the sides and the stairs in the middle. I raised it in a great Facebook Egyptology group called the Hatshepsut Project.



This photo shows the ramp at the temple. Now the design puzzles me. Why have
a slope on the sides and steps in the middle. The gradient is not easy to walk, the steps are the wrong distance apart for an easy walking pace.



So if you were carrying a shrine along it at the beautiful feast of the valley the priests would have been walking on the slope and the shrine would have been over the steps. Doesnt make sense.


They wouldnt have been able to carry it in a smooth glide. Try walking
up that slope, it is so uncomfortable you have to stop. Surely it would
have made more sense to have a smooth central ramp with steps either
side. But even then the steps dont allow a smooth carrying pace.

Do we know if this is really the original design or an interpretation?


This provoked a great debate where we discussed it at length. Sometimes Facebook can be so interesting.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/hatshepsutproject



THEN Richard Sellicks shared a lecture that was being given at the Essex Egyptology group https://www.facebook.com/groups/311726865593790/ where one of the current team was talking. I begged him to bring the question up at the lecture. Which he did. Richards reply together with an early photo




My picture from the early 90s and there was no stairway then! I spoke to Sergio Alarcón Robledo today who said it was not part of the concession and installed by the ministry!!


So my proposition was correct (I feel so vindicated).Big shout out to Richard for asking the question for me